Nutrition
 
 

Explanations for possible answers to why fishes tend to avoid eating the feces of conspecifics:

The taste of conspecific feces is less good. Yes. This may be of adaptive value in preventing an individual from eating feces that likely has less nutritional value than feces of a different species. See the next entry.

There is less nutrition in conspecific feces. Yes. Because members of the same species have the same nutritional needs, they have the same mechanisms to digest the foods they eat and to extract the same types of nutrients from them.

Transfer of parasites is minimised. Yes. Parasites are commonly species-specific and are less likely to do well in a different species.

Conspecific feces look unappetising. No. The appearance of the feces is unlikely to be a factor.

 
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