Nutrition
 
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Carnivory hot buttons for carnivory part of Biology of Caribbean Coral Reefs website hot button for zooplanktivore part of BCCR hot button for spongivore part of BCCR hot button for corallivores & other cnidivores part of BCCR hot button for gorgonivores part of BCCR hot button for benthic invertebrate-eaters part of BCCR hot button for piscivores part of BCCR

This part of carnivory deals with piscivores, that is, with coral-reef organisms, including fishes, sharks, squids, and marine mammals, that eat fishes. Other topics relating to carnivory on coral reefs can be accessed via the icons.

The topic dealt with below considers piscivory from the standpoint of the fishes being attacked.

 
 
seahorse dive leader for Biology of Caribbean Coral Reefs website photograph of a wounded schoolmaster taken from a video

"Here’s a schoolmaster sheltering…well, look at its tail!  Looks like it’s been through a mixer …probably better for it not to show it’s face, ah, I mean, tail, out in the open." - Little Cayman 2002

NOTE Lutjanus apodus

 
 

Carnivory: piscivores (eaters of fishes): eaters of wounded fishes

This small section deals with fishes that have been wounded through attacks by other fishes. Topics dealing with ROVING PISCIVORES and with AMBUSH PISCIVORES are presented in their own sections. There is an additional section on COOPERATIVE HUNTING.

 
 
seahorse dive leader for Biology of Caribbean Coral Reefs website photograph of a wounded Spanish hogfish taken from a video

"Well, here's someone healing nicely from a bite. It's a Spanish hogfish...survived the bite and survived long enough with the visible wound, for it to heal." - Turks & Caicos 2005

NOTE Bodianus rufus

 
  photo collage of wounded fishes
Healed wounds on larger fishes, like groupers and sharks, are fairly common, But it's not so common to see smaller reef fishes as adults with scars on their skin. Perhaps the smaller fishes are more likely to be eaten whole.
 

array of photographs of various piscivorous fishesNow, what sort of predator might have caused the wounds to the stoplight parrotfish? First, note that the bite-marks are asymmetrical, then study the array of possible predators shown and select the one you think most likely responsible.

The answer is given below along with explanations.

  array of photographs of various piscivorous fishes with descriptions of their bite modes
The most likely "perp" is a biting-type piscivore that attacks from the side. Of the fishes shown, the moray might be the best choice.
 
 
Let's hear what the fishes themselves think about it all...a doctorfish and a surgeonfish discuss their parrotfish patient... cartoon 1 in a series showing a doctorfish and surgeonfish conversing about their wounded patient
cartoon 2 in a series showing a doctorfish and surgeonfish conversing about their wounded patient cartoon 3 in a series showing a doctorfish and surgeonfish conversing about their wounded patient
cartoon 4 in a series showing a doctorfish and surgeonfish conversing about their wounded patient cartoon 5 in a series showing a doctorfish and surgeonfish conversing about their wounded patient
 
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